Stuck on your candle making journey? Our team has pulled together tips & tricks for the most commonly asked questions. With answers straight from our lab, you can rest assured you’ll be back on the right track in your candle making journey.

9cl container candles

rcx

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 38-40ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL 6; stabilo 5

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA1; LB1; LC1

• Recommended FO ratio: 10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

scx

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended Wick: LX12-14

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA1; LB1; LC1

• Recommended FO ratio: 10-8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8-7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

rs1

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL6; Stabilo 6

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA; LB1; LC1

• Recommended FO ratio: 10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: Several Days

Click here to view the 9cl RS1 collection

c-3

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL10-12, Stabilo 10

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA1; LB1; LC1

• Recommended FO ratio: 8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

Click here to view the 9cl C-3 collection

cs1

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended Wick: LX8-10 ; ECO 1/1.5/2

• Recommended Wooden Wick: SA2; SC2

• Recommended FO ratio: 7-8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 6-7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

Click here to view the 9cl CS1 collection

cs2

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL6

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA1; LB1; LC1

• Recommended FO ratio: 8-10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 7-8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time:  48-hours

Click here to view the 9cl CS2 collection

sasol 6213

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended Wick: LX8

• Recommended Wooden Wick: SA2; SC2

• Recommended FO ratio: 7-8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

Click here to view the 9cl Sasol 6213 collection

Kerax 4105

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL6

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA1; LB1; LC1

• Recommended FO ratio: 10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

Click here to view the 9cl Kerax 4105 collection

20cl container candles

rcx

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 38-40ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL 10; Stabilo 10

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA2; LB2

• Recommended FO ratio: 10-8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

scx

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended Wick: Stabilo 12; VRL11-14; VRL 18-22 (for difficult fragrances)

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA2; LB2

• Recommended FO ratio: 10-8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8-7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

rs1

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL 12; Stabilo 12

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA2; LB2

• Recommended FO ratio: 10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: Several Days

c-3

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL 14; Stabilo 14

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA2; LB2

• Recommended FO ratio: 8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

cs1

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended Wick: LX 12-14; ECO 4-6

• Recommended Wooden Wick: SA2; SB2

• Recommended FO ratio: 7-8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 6-7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

cs2

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL 8-10; Stabilo 10

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA2; LB2

• Recommended FO ratio: 8-10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 7-8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time:  48-hours

sasol 6213

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended Wick: SA2; SB2

• Recommended Wooden Wick:

• Recommended FO ratio: 7-8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

kerax 4105

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL 10; Stabilo 10

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA2; LB2

• Recommended FO ratio: 10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

30cl container candles

rcx

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 38-40ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL 12-14; Stabilo 12-14

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA2; LB3

• Recommended FO ratio: 10-8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

scx

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL 14; Stabilo 14-16

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA2; LB3

• Recommended FO ratio: 10-8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8-7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

rs1

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL 14-16; Stabilo 14-16

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA2; LB3

• Recommended FO ratio: 10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: Several Days

c-3

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL 16-18; Stabilo 16

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA2; LB3

• Recommended FO ratio: 8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

cs1

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended Wick: LX 16-18; ECO 8-10

• Recommended Wooden Wick: SB2; SC3

• Recommended FO ratio: 7-8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 6-7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

cs2

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL 14; Stabilo 12

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA2; LB3

• Recommended FO ratio: 8-10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 7-8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time:  48-hours

sasol 6213

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended Wick: LX 18; TG 16

• Recommended Wooden Wick: SB2; SC3

• Recommended FO ratio: 7-8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

kerax 4105

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended Wick: CL 14; Stabilo 12

• Recommended Wooden Wick: LA2; LB3

• Recommended FO ratio: 10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

wax melts

rcx melt blend

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 45-50ºC

• Recommended FO ratio: 8-10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

kerasoy pillar wax

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended FO Content: 10%

• Recommended EO Content: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure Time: 48-hours

ecoysoya melt

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 55ºC

• Recommended FO ratio: 10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

hpm

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended FO ratio: 10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time:  48-hours

cs blended pillar wax

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended FO ratio: 10%

• Recommended EO ratio: 8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

pillar candles

kerasoy pillar blend

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended FO ratio: 3-5%

• Recommended EO ratio: 3-5%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3%

• Cure time: 48-hours

hpm

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended FO Content: 3-5%

• Recommended EO Content: 3-5%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3%

• Cure Time: 48-hours

cs blended pillar wax

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 65ºC

• Recommended FO ratio: 3-5%

• Recommended EO ratio: 3-5%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3%

• Cure time: 48-hours

ecoysoya pillar blend

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Wick Range: CL; VRL; V

• Recommended FO Content: 5-8%

• Recommended EO Content: 5-8%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure Time: 48-hours

tealight candles

rcx melt blend

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 45-55ºC

• Wick Recommendation: TG Range

• Recommended FO ratio: 7-8%

• Recommended EO ratio: 7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure time: 48-hours

sasol 5203

• Recommended Melting Temperature: 70ºC

• Recommended Pouring Temperature: 60ºC

• Recommended FO Content: 5-7%

• Recommended EO Content: 5-7%

• Recommended Concentrated Oil Ratio: 3-5%

• Cure Time: 48-hours

diffusers

ecosystem vegan diffuser base

Due to the viscosity of both the diffuser base and the oils, we would advise measuring these in grams to ensure that you are using the correct percentages.  

Fragrance oil 

We advise using 8-10% of concentrated fragrance oil with 92-90% of base. We typically use 15-20% of fragrance and then 85-80% Augeo, however, this will very much depend on the fragrance. We can only recommend testing to ensure you are happy with the finished product. 

This has been broken down below for our 100ML and 165ML bottles –  

100ML - (80/20) 80G of base to 20G of fragrance or (85/15) – 85G of base to 15G of fragrance.  

165ML – (80/20) 132G of base to 33G of fragrance or (85/15) – 140.25G of base to 24.75G of fragrance.  

Essential Oil 

We have found that less is more when using essential oils. We would advise testing with the ratios of 85/15 or 90/10. This has been broken down below for our 100ML and 165ML bottles –  

100ML - (85/15) 85G of base to 15G of fragrance or (90/10) – 90G of base to 10G of essential oil.  

165ML – (85/15) 140.25G of base to 24.75G of fragrance or (90/10) – 148.5G of base to 16.5G of essential oil.  

Please ensure to check the IFRA certificate for each fragrance to ensure that it is suitable for use in a diffuser. This can be found on the product page of the website.  

Once the base and the oil are in your diffuser bottle – tighten your cap with the stopper or EPE wad – and give it a really good shake.  

Reeds 

We have two types of reeds available in different lengths and colours. These are rattan reeds and fibre reeds.  

Rattan reeds are made using natural rattan – due to the nature of the product, these reeds can vary in appearance.  

Fibre reeds are made from synthetic materials and are uniform in appearance.  

You may be able to use 6-8 of the longer reeds (3.5 x 250) or five or six of the shorter reeds (6mm x 175mm.  

augeo

Due to the viscosity of both the diffuser base and the oils, we would advise measuring these in grams to ensure that you are using the correct percentages.

Fragrance oil 

We advise using 8-10% of concentrated fragrance oil with 92-90% of base. We typically use 15-20% of fragrance and then 85-80% Augeo, however, this will very much depend on the fragrance. We can only recommend testing to ensure you are happy with the finished product. 

This has been broken down below for our 100ML and 165ML bottles –  

100ML - (80/20) 80G of base to 20G of fragrance or (85/15) – 85G of base to 15G of fragrance.  

165ML – (80/20) 132G of base to 33G of fragrance or (85/15) – 140.25G of base to 24.75G of fragrance.   

Essential Oil 

We have found that less is more when using essential oils. We would advise testing with the ratios of 85/15 or 90/10. This has been broken down below for our 100ML and 165ML bottles –  

100ML - (85/15) 85G of base to 15G of fragrance or (90/10) – 90G of base to 10G of essential oil.  

165ML – (85/15) 140.25G of base to 24.75G of fragrance or (90/10) – 148.5G of base to 16.5G of essential oil.  

Please ensure to check the IFRA certificate for each fragrance to ensure that it is suitable for use in a diffuser. This can be found on the product page of the website.  

Once the base and the oil are in your diffuser bottle – tighten your cap with the stopper or EPE wad – and give it a really good shake.  

Reeds 

We have two types of reeds available in different lengths and colours. These are rattan reeds and fibre reeds.  

Rattan reeds are made using natural rattan – due to the nature of the product, these reeds can vary in appearance.  

Fibre reeds are made from synthetic materials and are uniform in appearance.  

You may be able to use 6-8 of the longer reeds (3.5 x 250) or five or six of the shorter reeds (6mm x 175mm.

room sprays

cyclomethicone

This is a silicone-based room spray and linen mist base. When using this, we would advise using a maximum load of 5%.

Please ensure to check the IFRA certificate of the fragrance you will be using to seek clarification that it is suitable to be used in a room spray.  

When testing the spray, we would advise using a discreet area to ensure that you are pleased with the outcome. The onus is on you to carry out your testing first before releasing it into the market for sale – fragrances can cause damage to surfaces so please make sure you fully test your finished product.  

ecosystem mist base

This is a vegan-friendly and cruelty-free base. The maximum load for this would be 5%.  

Once you have added the base and the fragrance that you require to your chosen spray bottle, you are able to give these a good shake to ensure that they are fully mixed.  

Please ensure to check the IFRA certificate of the fragrance you will be using to seek clarification that it is suitable to be used in a room spray.  

When testing the spray, we would advise using a discreet area to ensure that you are pleased with the outcome. The onus is on you to carry out your testing first before releasing it into the market for sale – fragrances can cause damage to surfaces so please make sure you fully test your finished product.  

Troubleshooting

frosting

What is frosting?

Frosting (also called blooming) is an informal term for polymorphism, which refers to when the wax is in different states at once. It manifests as a white crystalline trail.

When does frosting occur?

This phenomenon only impacts plant-based waxes. Soy and rapeseed waxes are particularly prone to frosting. That being said, frosting is highly unpredictable and can occur at any time during the candle-making process. It may even be the case that in the same batch, some candles frost while others do not.

How do I minimise frosting?

Get the right cooling profile

To minimise the risk of frosting, experiment with your cooling temperatures. The right temperature will depend on your fragranced wax mixture.

Blend with paraffin

Frosting only occurs with plant-based waxes. Therefore, using plant and mineral wax blends substantially mitigates the risk of frosting.

Pour at the right temperature

Our general recommendation would be to pour your wax as close to the congealing point as possible, which is the temperature at which your wax becomes cloudy. This varies from wax to wax and will help your candle to solidify faster.

mushrooming

Why is my wick mushrooming?

Clubbing, or “mushrooming” as it is referred to in extreme cases, is caused by incomplete combustion of the wax and fragrance oil. This can occur when too much fuel is being delivered to the wick compared to the amount of oxygen being supplied, leading to the formation of carbon deposits on the wick. It should be noted that for highly scented candles, clubbing cannot usually be completely avoided.

How do I prevent candles from mushrooming?

Minor clubbing is very common and is not normally a cause of concern. More pronounced mushrooming is often a sign that a candle is overwicked, so down-wicking will reduce fuel flow and should reduce the effect, although this will create a smaller melt pool.

Sometimes it will be necessary to change to a different wick family to reduce clubbing or mushrooming. Most wick families have differing chemical treatments, or constructions, which are suited to different candle systems. For example, LX wicks are best suited to paraffin candles with low to moderate scent loads, whereas V wicks are designed to deal with heavy fragrance loads, even containing brass powder to help vaporise any carbon deposits.

Occasionally, a particular fragrance oil will cause clubbing regardless of the wick used. In such cases, a different wax blend may improve the situation. Not all fragrances are optimised for candles, but as a home fragrance first business, that is our start point.

Which wick should I use with my wax?
The choice of wick will depend on which wax is being used. LX or TG wicks work well with mineral waxes. Stabilo, CL, V, TB, ECO or PGS wicks can be used with mineral or vegetable blends, while VRL wicks are suited to blends containing a high percentage of plant wax.

glass adhesion

Why does the wax pull away from my jar?

Candle wax shrinks as it cools from liquid to solid. After the initial pouring, the liquid wax will be in contact with the glass. As the wax cools, the solid wax will break away from the glass surface as its volume decreases.

Wax Selection

Wax Type

Candle wax pulls away from the candle glass because the wax contracts slightly as it cools. This is an inherent property of the wax and cannot really be avoided, so most waxes will pull away from the candle glass to some extent. Mineral wax in particular will have poor glass adhesion. Soy wax can have better glass adhesion but will still pull away to some extent over time.

Temperature

Pouring wax at the correct temperature can improve glass adhesion in some cases. However, wax shrinkage is an inherent property of the wax and cannot really be avoided completely, so most waxes will pull away from the candle glass to some extent.

How do I improve glass adhesion?

Clean Jars

Making sure the inside of the glass is clean and free from release agents can help promote adhesion.Most glass is coated in a wax-oil mixture, called cold-coating.This can cause problems for painting and adhesion.

Pre-heating Jars

Pre-heating candle glasses will improve glass adhesion, but this is normally only temporary, and the wax will usually pull away from the glass over a period of hours, days or weeks.

Pouring Temperature

Pouring wax at the correct temperature can improve glass adhesion in some cases. However, wax shrinkage is an inherent property of the wax and cannot really be avoided completely, so most waxes will pull away from the candle glass to some extent.

Room Conditions

The room temperature should be greater than 20° when pouring candles. If the ambient temperature is too low, the wax will cool and shrink more quickly, and pull away from the glass more readily.

Does my choice of glass impact glass adhesion?

Opaque Glasses

Glass adhesion is nothing to be concerned about if you are using an opaque candle glass. Even if the wax does pull away from the side of the glass, this will not normally be noticeable apart from perhaps a slight gap between the surface of the candle and the side of the glass.

sooting

Why is my candle giving off soot?

Soot is formed by incomplete combustion of candle wax and fragrance oils, leading to formation of carbon deposits. Sooting will almost always occur, but in varying degrees. It is usually emitted when the flame is disturbed, either by airflow, excess fuel delivery or poor wick posture. Excessive sooting can be avoided by experimenting with different wick families and sizes. Some wick families are more compatible with certain wax types.

How high is too high for candle flames?

A 30cl candle would typically have a flame height of around 30-35mm. For a 20cl candle, the optimum flame height would be around 25-30mm. A candle flame can be as high as 75mm, but a flame of this height would probably fail a sooting behaviour test and could also fail a fire safety test.

How much oil should I use?

Different Jar Sizes

The size of candle glass doesn’t impact the percentage of oil used. The same percentage of oil can be used in candles throughout a series of different sizes, although
each differently sized candle will require a different wick.

Different Preferences

The amount of fragrance oil in a candle is decided by the chandler, and is typically based on the cold and hot throw of the candle. Candles containing larger percentages of oil can be more challenging to wick correctly.

Different Waxes

Plant waxes will generally be able to hold more fragrance oil than mineral waxes. Plant waxes can normally accommodate 10 - 12% fragrance oil without difficulty, but the content can be reduced if required. Mineral wax candles can give good cold and hot throw at 8 - 10% but a fragrance content of less than 8% is not uncommon. Candles with fragrance concentrations of more than 14% are very unusual as they can become very expensive.

Wick Selection

The choice of wick will depend on which wax is being used. LX or TG wicks work well with mineral waxes. Stabilo, CL, V, TB, ECO or PGS wicks can be used with
mineral or vegetable blends, while VRL wicks are suited to blends containing a high percentage of plant wax. Overwicking can cause larger flames which can then form larger melt pools and generate more soot. Overwicking is the term used to describe the use of a larger wick than necessary for a particular candle.

sweating

There are two main reasons why a “sweating” effect is observed in candles. Candle “sweating” is sometimes observed in soy wax blends. The sweating occurs when the fragrance leaches from the wax and is usually induced by a temperature change. Sweating can sometimes occur randomly, but it can also indicate that there is too much fragrance oil in the candle. In this case, it may be worth re-making the candle with a lower concentration of fragrance oil. The sweating doesn’t affect the burning performance of the candle.

Sweating can also be observed in some plant wax blends before fragrance is added. This is probably soy or coconut oil from one of the components of the blend and could be related to how quickly the wax was cooled or to the pouring/storage temperatures, perhaps a change in humidity.

Any form of sweating can be removed by gently mopping the sweat beads with a paper tissue. The candle should then burn as expected as sweating does not significantly affect the burning profile of a candle.

jump lines

What are jump lines?
Jump lines (also known as chatter or stutters) are thin rings or horizontal lines that form along the outer edge of container candles and pillar candles.
Why do jump lines happen?
Jump lines predominantly occur with paraffin or hybrid waxes as they have higher melting points than 100% plant waxes. When wax is poured into cool or room temperature glasses, if the wax temperature isn’t high enough, wax can solidify very quickly when it comes into contact with the jar. In extreme cases, it can solidify in stages, even as the wax is being poured, causing ‘jump lines’.
How do I avoid jump lines?
Choose opaque candles
While not aesthetically pleasing, jump lines do not impede candle performance and only manifest where the wax meets the glass. Therefore, avoiding clear candle jars and choosing opaque ones will hide this defect.
Temperature Control
Jump lines occur when the wax solidifies on contact with the glass, so there are only two ways to prevent jump lines from forming…
- Pre-heat the candle jars
Warming your jars will make it less likely that wax will solidify on contact. The cooler you want to pour the wax, the warmer the glass will need to be to avoid jump lines. The golden rule is that 'the wax should be 10°C above the melt point after it's been poured', especially where it is in contact with the glass. Warming jars means they will subtract less heat from the poured wax. Pre-heating the jars to a known temperature is the best of the two options, as it is repeatable.
- Increase the pouring temperature
Alternatively, heat the fragranced wax in 5°C increments until you find a pour temperature that gives no jump lines. This is a good method if the place where you pour candles is at a consistent temperature, as the process will be repeatable. If using this method, you should still try to pour the candles as cool as possible.

essential oils vs fragrance oils

what is the difference between essential and fragrance oils

Essential Oils are made from natural ingredients using processes such as steam distillation and solvent extraction. Fragrance oils are made from synthetic materials with added chemicals to enhance the aroma.

recommended ratios

Essential oils usually have different viscosity than fragrance oils as they are made from natural ingredients, while fragrance oils mainly contain synthetic components. As natural oils tend to be more viscous, we recommend using them at a lower ratio. If you are looking to make a candle using essential oils, we advise testing your candles with 6-8%, whilst 15% would be a good starting point for your diffusers. If you prefer fragrance oils, you can start testing your candles with 8-10%, and our recommended diffuser ratio is 15-20%. Please always check the oil product page, as some oils may be subject to limitations under IFRA/CLP guidelines.

We recently introduced new concentrated fragrance oils. You`re able to use a lower ratio with these products. Depending on your wax, our recommended ratio is 3-5% for candles, whilst with diffusers; we would advise you to start testing with 8-10%.

Which wicks are most suited for my oils?

The choice of wick will depend on which wax is being used. LX or TG wicks work well with mineral waxes. Stabilo, CL, V, TB, ECO or PGS wicks can be used with mineral or vegetable blends, while VRL wicks are suited to blends containing a high percentage of plant wax. Overwicking can cause larger flames which can then form larger melt pools and generate more soot. Overwicking is the term used to describe the use of a larger wick than necessary for a particular candle.

What does viscosity affect?

The viscosity will be different for each oil and it is affected by temperature. As temperature increases, viscosity decreases. Fragrance can be quite viscous at room temperature, so warming it up a little before adding it to your wax can help the two materials to mix better. You will achieve a better hot throw when adding fragrance to hotter wax as the hot wax lowers the viscosity of the fragrance - and the wax too - making it
easier to get good fragrance distribution. This can be achieved at lower by simply mixing for longer.

wood wick size guide

Wood wicks are made to precise dimensions. Increasing the thickness or width of the wick will increase the capillary flow of the wax/fragrance mixture which in turn will increase the flame size. The below table should help you with your wick selection. The right wick will depend on the used wax, fragrance and jar size, therefore we can only recommend testing to ensure you are happy with the finished product.

wooden wicks

different wood wick types

Single Ply wooden wicks 

We recommend our single-ply wooden wicks to be used with paraffin waxes. Paraffin waxes form less viscous melt pools than plant waxes, so a single-ply wooden wick is normally sufficient. Single-ply wooden wicks can be doubled up by clipping two wicks together for use with plant waxes. However, if doubling-up is required, an easier option is to use a booster wick. We can only recommend testing to ensure you`re happy with the finished product. 

Booster Wicks 

Our booster wicks are suited for plant waxes. Plant waxes tend to be more viscous than paraffin waxes when melted, so booster wicks are required to give an acceptable burn profile. Booster wicks are a neat and simple alternative to “doubling-up” single wooden wicks. A good starting point for a 20cl jar would be our LA2 or LB1 wick whilst you can start testing our 30cl jar with an LA2 or LB3 wick. We can only recommend testing to ensure you`re happy with the finished product. 

Tube Wicks 

Tube wicks are only available in one size. A tube wick can be expected to perform reasonably well in a 30cl glass with RCX wax, although the burn profile will be affected by the fragrance added. If required you`re able to add our thinnest wooden wick to support the burn. Although tube wicks can in principle be used in other candle systems, they will generally give a much higher burn rate and can cause sooting and very deep/hot melt pools. We can only recommend testing to ensure you`re happy with the finished product.